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Did you know Skyview Weather Has a Blog?

Skyview Weather is proud to present our comprehensive weather blog, an integral part of our website that offers a deep dive into the world of meteorology. Our blog is a treasure trove of information, featuring a variety of content that caters to both weather enthusiasts and professionals alike. Here’s what you can expect when you visit our blog.

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New blogs are published online every week!

Synoptic Weather Outlooks

Read comprehensive overviews of synoptic-scale (broad-scale) atmospheric conditions. Our synoptic outlooks typically include a discussion on pressure patterns, fronts, wind direction and speed, and how these elements are expected to change and evolve over the coming days.

Storm Summaries and Analysis

Our blog provides comprehensive summaries of winter weather events. Recent coverage includes the active weather weekend in the Great Plains, and an analysis of the heavy, wet snowstorm that hit the Denver metro area last month.

Captivating Weather News

Delve into fascinating weather-related news and features. Our blog has covered events such as the Total Solar Eclipse of April 8, 2024, providing observations, analysis, and a cloud cover outlook for this astronomical spectacle.

Educational Weather Articles & Insights

Broaden your meteorological knowledge with our educational articles. Topics range from the science snowflake shapes and formation, to the role of weather satellites in forecasting. Our pieces are designed to enlighten and inform readers about the complexities of atmospheric phenomena.

Empowering Readers through Weather Education

In addition to our blog content, Skyview Weather provides a growing online Weather Education library. Weather education not only enhances scientific literacy but also empowers individuals to make informed decisions, stay safe during extreme weather events, and appreciate the interconnectedness of our planet’s systems.

Our online Weather Education section contains a collection of weather and climate resources thoughtfully composed by Skyview meteorologists. Readers can access articles about fundamental concepts, such as The Water Cycle and El Nino, or explore advanced topics about lightning or banded snowfall.

Weather education provides essential knowledge useful in everyday life. It empowers individuals and organizations to make informed decisions when faced with weather-related situations. For instance, comprehending basic weather concepts can help mitigate risks and protect oneself, clients, and colleagues from weather hazards like lightning strikes, hail, and flooding.

Moreover, tailored training programs in weather awareness and safety can enhance preparedness within various sectors, including business, public services, outdoor recreation, and industrial facilities. By gaining foundational knowledge about weather systems and severe weather preparedness, people can develop strategies to minimize risks associated with thunderstorms, winter storms, and other severe weather events.

Weather Outlook Tools

As part of our commitment to providing top-tier services, Skyview Weather subscribers now enjoy exclusive access to an array of cutting-edge weather outlook tools. From radar and satellite imagery to lightning probability forecasts and beyond, our suite of weather resources is designed to keep you informed and prepared. Access these tools and live operational weather data by signing into the Skyview Weather online member portal.


Colorado Drought Update

May Drought Monitor Map of Colorado issued April 30, 2024.

As of May 2024, the drought conditions in Colorado have shown marginal improvement compared to the previous month, particularly in certain areas of southwestern Colorado. Regrettably, the southeastern region of the state has experienced an increase in drought severity due to insufficient precipitation. The drought conditions have escalated from being classified as ‘abnormally dry’ to a ‘moderate drought’, and this has also extended into the eastern regions of the state.

As we transition into the latter part of spring, the state has had a relatively arid commencement to May. Given the current climatic trends and the lack of adequate rainfall, it is anticipated that the drought conditions may exacerbate as the month progresses. It is important to note that the onset of drought in Colorado and across the Intermountain West region can occur rapidly and last from a season to several decades. The state’s reliance on winter snowpack and summer monsoons for water supply further underscores the significance of these climatic conditions. Therefore, continuous monitoring and interstate coordination are crucial to manage the current and future impacts of these drought conditions.


May 2024 Temperature Anomaly Forecast

May Temperature Outlook Map of the US issued April 30, 2024.

The temperature outlook for May 2024 indicates that portions of the United States are expected to experience temperatures that align with the seasonal norms. Specifically, regions in the Pacific Northwest, Plains, Midwest, and western parts of the country are projected to have an equal likelihood of experiencing average temperatures.

However, temperatures exceeding the average for this time of the year are likely across the Southern, Great Lakes, and Northeastern portions of the country. It is noteworthy that no regions in the US are forecasted to experience temperatures that fall below the average during the month of May.

The temperature patterns observed thus far in Colorado have largely adhered to the seasonal norms, with daily temperatures fluctuating between the low to mid-60s and the low to mid-70s. There have been a few instances of evening temperatures dropping below the freezing point, but such occurrences are expected to diminish as we progress further into the month.

Overall, the temperature anomaly outlook for May 2024 suggests a predominantly average temperature pattern across the United States, with the exception of above-average temperatures expected in the southern and eastern regions.

May 2024 Precipitation Anomaly Forecast

May Precipitation Outlook Map of the US issued April 30, 2024.

The precipitation outlook for May 2024 suggests that the majority of the United States is expected to receive precipitation amounts that align with the seasonal averages. Notably, the southern plains and the Appalachian regions of the country are projected to have a higher than average likelihood of receiving above-average precipitation.

Conversely, regions south of Colorado extending into New Mexico, as well as most of Florida, are anticipated to experience below-average precipitation. It is noteworthy that the onset of May has been generally mild across most states, and the relatively dry conditions across the Front Range have significantly reduced the precipitation amounts received so far this month.

Colorado April Weather Summary

In April 2024, Denver International Airport (DIA) experienced temperatures slightly above the average, with a mean daily high of 63.9°F and a low of 37.1°F, resulting in an average monthly temperature of 50.5°F. This was 2.7°F higher than the typical monthly average of 47.8°F1. The highest temperature recorded was 80°F on April 14th, while the lowest was 24°F on April 5th.

DIA observed 3.28 inches of precipitation, which is 1.60 inches more than the average for April. Throughout the month, five storm systems were observed, contributing to a total snow accumulation of 6.3 inches at DIA. The most significant snowfall occurred between April 19th and 21st, affecting the northern Metro areas and resulting in a balanced snow distribution across the Denver Metro area into Douglas County.

In the Denver Metro area, snowfall ranged from 3.0 to 6.0 inches, with isolated higher amounts. The foothills and regions above 6,500 feet received 10.0 to 20.0 inches of snow due to elevation and temperature factors.

Southeastern Colorado, including the Colorado Springs area, also reported above-average temperatures. Colorado Springs Airport recorded an average high of 63.8°F and a low of 36.6°F, culminating in a monthly average of 50.2°F, which is 2.7°F above the normal average of 47.5°F2. The warmest days reached 78°F on April 14th, 22nd, and 30th, while the coldest days dropped to 28°F on April 9th and 11th. The airport reported 1.52 inches of precipitation, slightly above the average, with the majority occurring on April 27th.

Pueblo, Colorado, experienced higher-than-average temperatures with below-average precipitation. The average daily high was 70.2°F, with a low of 37.5°F. The peak temperature of 90°F was recorded on April 30th, marking the first occurrence of such warmth for the year. The coldest temperature was 25°F on April 8th. Pueblo received only 1.07 inches of precipitation, which is 0.50 inches below the average for April, with most precipitation occurring on April 27th. Overall, southeastern Colorado saw limited weather events, with only four notable occurrences in April. Warmer conditions led to minimal roadway impacts as most snow melted upon contact with the pavement. Snowfall totals for the Palmer Divide ranged from 5.0 to 9.0 inches, with northern Colorado Springs receiving 0.5 to 2.0 inches, and central to southern Colorado Springs seeing a trace to 0.5 inches. Pueblo and Cañon City reported negligible snowfall for the month.

Weather Statistics for Denver International Airport, April 2024

DIA April 2024 Temperature (°F)

Observed ValueNormal ValueDeparture From Normal
Average Max63.9°F61.7°F2.2°F
Average Min37.1°F33.9°F3.2°F
Monthly Mean50.5°F47.8°F2.7°F
Days With Max 90 Or Above000
Days With Max 32 Or Below00.5-0.5
Days With Min 32 Or Below913.2-4.2
Days With Min 0 Or Below000

DIA April 2024 Liquid Precipitation (Inches)

Observed ValueDate(S)Normal ValueDeparture From Normal
Monthly Total3.28”1.68”0.80”
Yearly Total
Greatest In 24 Hours1.68”04/26-04/27
Days With Measurable Precip.1814.63.4

May 2024 Preview

The month of May in Colorado is characterized by its climatic variability and is often one of the wetter and cloudier months of the year. It frequently marks the end of the snowfall season for many regions along the I-25 corridor, particularly the Palmer Divide. This year, however, the plains are not anticipated to receive significant snowfall. Nevertheless, the foothills and potentially areas along the Palmer Divide may experience one or two more snow events in the coming weeks.

According to the drought monitor, there are equal probabilities for above or below-average temperatures and precipitation. Given the current onset of May, it appears more probable that temperatures will exceed the norm, while precipitation will be below average for numerous regions of eastern Colorado.

The average high temperatures at the beginning of May are 65°F, escalating to 78°F by the end of the month, a rise of 13°F. Conversely, average low temperatures commence the month at 38°F and conclude at 49°F, an increase of 11°F. These warmer temperatures in May enable individuals to commence their gardening activities as the last frost/freeze of the season typically occurs during the initial weeks. However, as observed in the previous year, a freeze can occur as late as the third or even fourth week of the month. Nevertheless, no further hard freezes are anticipated for the remainder of this year.

Typically, there are three days with temperatures at or below freezing during May. However, if current weather models are accurate, we may avoid a freeze from this point forward. The average monthly precipitation in May is 2.16”, and measurable precipitation is observed on an average of 10 days during the month. This implies that approximately one out of every three days contains some form of moisture.

On the snowfall front, an average of 1.4” of snow falls in May, but many years observe no snowfall at all. It is anticipated that this will be one of those years for Denver International Airport (DIA), as temperatures are expected to remain too warm over the next several weeks.

The thunderstorm season commences in May, with typically at least six days during the month experiencing storms that produce thunder. Thunderstorms that develop in May often contain hail, as the freezing levels in the atmosphere are still relatively low following winter. Severe thunderstorms can also develop in May; however, June is the peak month for these types of thunderstorms.

In terms of severe weather potential in northeast Colorado, the month of May often witnesses a lot of extremes, from rain and snow to severe storms and tornadoes. Severe weather season certainly starts to pick up, but some systems can still produce snowfall across the area. In fact, impressive May storm systems in northeast Colorado have been known to unleash hail, tornadoes, heavy rains, and flash flooding.

Denver’s Monthly Temperature, Rainfall, And Snowfall Extremes For May (1872-Present)

Top 20 Warmest May’s

RankAvgYear
164.71934
263.21994
3621886
461.71958
561.61974
661.61879
761.51939
861.42018
961.31936
1061.11875
11611941
12611874
1360.91963
1460.91956
1560.81881
1660.71977
1760.61992
1860.61900
1960.52012
2060.41897

Top 20 Wettest May’s

RankTotalYear
18.571876
27.311957
36.121969
45.532023
55.061973
64.951935
74.881938
84.881898
94.792011
104.771967
114.671995
124.641987
134.611884
144.461958
154.31883
164.261988
174.181947
184.181912
194.151891
204.121961

Top 20 Snowiest May’s

RankTotalYear
115.51898
213.71950
313.51978
413.21912
5121917
6101908
791907
88.91893
98.81957
108.31944
118.21979
1281931
137.61983
147.22001
151931
1672003
176.41961
186.41915
196.31910
206.11975

Top 20 Coldest May’s

RankAvgYear
148.71917
2501995
350.11935
450.31907
551.41983
651.51892
751.62019
8521946
952.61967
1052.71924
1152.81943
1252.91915
13532015
14531950
15531898
16531882
1753.12011
1853.21885
1953.31909
2053.41953

Top 20 Driest May’s

RankTotalYear
10.061974
20.091886
30.151899
40.221919
50.341977
60.341966
70.431925
80.491972
90.521911
100.531900
110.61954
120.61921
130.641970
140.651984
150.681963
160.712005
170.711968
180.751903
190.751873
200.822013

Top 20 Least Snowiest May’s

RankTotalYear
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Numerous years with no snow

May Climatology for Denver

(Normal Period 1991-2020 Dia Data)

Temperature

Average High71.2°F
Average Low43.6°F
Monthly Mean57.4°F
Days With High 90 Or Above0.8
Days With High 32 Or Below0
Days With Low 32 Or Below2.9
Days With Lows Zero Or Below0

Precipitation

PrecipitationObserved Value
Monthly Mean2.16”
Days With Measurable Precipitation10.4
Average Snowfall In Inches1.4”
Days With 1.0 Inch Of Snow Or MoreNA

Miscellaneous Averages

Heating Degree Days261
Cooling Degree Days26
Wind Speed (Mph)6.3 mph
Wind DirectionSouth
Days With Thunderstorms6
Days With Dense Fog1
Percent Of Sunshine Possible64%

Extremes

Record High95 on 5/26/1942
Record Low19 on 5/3/1907 & 5/2/2013
Warmest64.7 in 1934
Coldest48.7 in 1917
Wettest8.57 in 1876*, * -Wettest month in Denver history!
Driest0.06” in 1974
Snowiest15.5” in 1898
Least Snowy0.0” in numerous years

Winter 2023/2024 Snowfall Accumulation for the Colorado Eastern Plains

CityOctNovDecJanFebMarAprTotal
Aurora6.62.310.43.911.617.53.155.4
Boulder5.07.89.28.513.919.15.268.7
Brighton4.74.01.12.27.88.84.533.1
Broomfield4.35.33.25.113.922.35.459.5
Castle Rock9.02.19.712.117.431.13.484.8
Colorado Springs Airport0.01.18.45.111.513.30.640.0
Denver DIA7.52.91.44.213.79.26.345.2
Denver Downtown5.32.16.24.610.912.15.546.7
Golden10.714.014.613.237.754.720.2165.1
Fort Collins5.79.60.03.35.711.14.339.7
Highlands Ranch5.81.86.95.111.620.24.255.6
Lakewood8.64.111.35.521.323.04.878.6
Littleton10.01.66.03.712.314.34.452.3
Monument6.51.514.814.120.325.25.087.4
Parker7.41.08.89.112.327.13.268.9
Sedalia – Hwy 6710.53.39.412.820.035.64.095.6
Thornton4.04.44.44.412.812.55.848.3
Westminster5.14.75.34.813.720.04.458.0
Wheat Ridge6.03.46.95.322.122.66.973.2
Windsor3.55.5TR4.99.011.04.037.9
Snowfall accumulation totals are aggregated and QC’d by Skyview Weather Meteorologists using a combination of both in-situ and remote weather observing systems, model-derived Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) data, and proprietary snowfall measurements via trained storm spotters.